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Review: Cryorig H5 Universal

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Feb
19
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Hey there,

I recently was gifted a new motherboard, cpu, memory and PC tower by a clanmate.
After using a watercooled Core i5 2400 for 6 years in a row, it was time to do an upgrade.
It was a big surprise that I got the upgrade for free. The case came with a stock cooler and as we all know, although it does work, it’s a piece of <beep> when it comes to gaming and/or video editing. Hence the reason I went out to purchase a new cooler.
Watercooling wasn’t in the budget, so Aircooling it is.

Lets start with some specs on the right:

The Case
Coolermaster CMStorm Scout II
ASRock H97 Performance Socket 1150
Kingston HyperX Fury Red 4x4GB
Intel Core i7 4771 3,5/3,9 ghz
Cryorig H5 Universal
G.E.I.L. Zenith S3 128GB
WD 1TB ECO
WD 500GB ECO
Seagate 1TB External Drive
Gigabyte Radeon HD7950 3GB Boost Edition

Peripherals
Keyboard: Rapoo 8200 Black
Mouse: Zalman FPSGun FG1000
Headset: Sharkoon H30

Monitors
HP 2159m 21,5 inch 1920×1080
Samsung 20 inch 1680×1050

The Review

Click an image to view the full spec !

Before swapping the stock cooler for the Cryorig H5 Universal cooler, I decided to show you the temperatures at idle and full load performance.
As you can see, with stock cooling under full load, the temperature is annoyingly high.
Too high if you ask me.

The first picture is while idle.
The second picture is under full load.

I wasn’t sure whether the stock cooler, with previous experiences, would let go easily.
During at least 12 previous case builds, I’ve stumbled with a very stuck stock cooler which took ages to remove. Fortunately, this time it let loose easily.

I turned off the PC and immediately started with removing the stock cooler. The socket was still around 45ºC, so the cooling paste was still a bit liquid~ish.
Check out the pictures and click to view the full version.

The case itself is quite big. Since 2002 I’m used to full- and bigtowers due to its cablemanagement, airflow and modding possibilities. This one is no exclusion to that.
However, I didn’t realize the Cryorig H5 Universal is thát big. I’ve seen it all. Noctua’s, Scythe Mugens, big ass watercoolers, heck I’ve even had the extreme big Scythe Orochi Rev.B for my Q6600 back in ’09. But dang, the H5 is huge. Fortunately, it fits the case. By an inch haha.

In order to position it properly for the screwing holes (this cooler has the easiest mounting way like .. I’ve éver seen), I had to remove my graphics card ánd the dustfilter on top of the case. Luckily I’m keen on this, I’ve had an issue once where I mounted a watercoolingkit faulty. Costed me the cpu, motherboard ánd graphics cards while I was at school. And my keyboard died. And mouse … meh.

A big PLUS to this company is the CryoPaste. Last time I used this special paste, was when I had a nitrogen cooler (2003!!) for my then AMD Athlon 64 3700+ (s754, 2.4ghz @ 5.4ghz !!). This is one of the best cooling pasts out there.

So, the first startup. Immediately after booting, well, trying to boot, the PC turned off.
I was like, what the heck ? But yah, I forgot to turn on the power supply switch. Doh.

I booted into the UEFI BIOS and checked out the hardware monitor to see if I made a proper €50.- purchase. After a 5 minute wait, I realized I had. Proper temps. Okay, the average living room temperature was around 26ºC (winter season, ey?), so during Spring, the temps will be lower.

Last but not least, while booting in Windows I >almost< immediately started stress testing the new cooler.

First I let my PC alone for 15 minutes, had to do stuff.
The first pic is, of course, in idle mode. Proper temp.
I used to have an Intel Core i5 2400 3.1ghz in combination with the Corsair h100i and that one was 38ºC in Idle mode.

The second screen shows the stress test temperature.
I’m a huge fan of the Far Cry series and for this test, I played Far Cry 4.
Note that I was recording the game as well, which normally ups the temp with 4-6ºC over the normal full load temperature.

I’ve played the game for more than 40 minutes and this is the max temperature, again, with an average living room temperature of 26ºC.

Conclusion

We’ve come to the end of this small review.

I was astonished about the size of this cooler. The cooler itself is quite big, however the weight it quite low. I’m used to Noctua’s, Scythe’s and such. Those coolers are pretty heavy.

Right now, upon finishing this review, the cooler has been operating in my PC for 3 hours now. The average processor temperature is 35ºC which is very low considering the living room temperature.

Most reviews on the net regarding ány cooler are written after several days of testing.
I wanted to write a review about the first few hours of usage.

I can’t tell much yet, other than that the cooler is quite silent in idle (approx. 22dbA in idle, 32dbA under full load). Let me be clear, the cooler is set to 1300RPM. I chose for 1300RPM due to the Winter season and the average living room temperature. I’ll probably shun the RPM a bit, 800-1100RPM, when Spring kicks in, so I’m sure the noise level will drop. Maybe, just maybe, I’ll get a new graphics card soon. The current one is over 4 years old.

Future plans
The cooler came with one 140mm thin fan, Cryorig supplied an extra clip for a second 140mm fan. I’m planning to purchase a second Cryorig fan in the summer.

All in all I’m pretty happy with this cooler. I’ve always been someone who secretes himself from other people. I never follow the masses in purchasing new stuff.
I love to tryout stuff no one seems to trust. Check out the link below for the company profile. The company has been around since the early 00’s and since 2013 you can buy their products. The Cryorig H5 Universal has been around since 2014.

The Company
– http://www.cryorig.com/

The cooler I have
– http://www.cryorig.com/h5-universal.php

Thanks for reading my review. All pictures are courtesy of The Ramteam Network and HLDesign. HLDesign is an official TRN Design Company.

Got questions, feedback or tips/ideas ? Reply in the comments below !

With regards,
Youri
– Pr1nceHapi

My setup including my DJ stuff

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